Topic-icon Coloured History

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12 years 6 months ago #101140 by Jay
ern18's comment on the need for school textbooks to be updated got me thinking about what I would like my kids to learn at school.

There are so many untold stories about Coloureds, even Coloureds themselves are unaware of their own history. We know so much about European history, but what about African history, Asian history, coloured history?

How about a thread to inform and educate ourselves about Coloured history. I know that history can be subjective, and we are bound to disagree on certain matters, but this could be a way of learning and educating ourselves. Don't you think?

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12 years 6 months ago #101142 by ern18
I suggest reading Buckingham Palace Distric Six -Richard Rive

It's fiction - but it was an eye opener for me.

OH, and so was watching Ghoema!

I'm sure there's tons more though!

No man can make you feel inferior unless you give him your consent Bryce Courtnay in White Thorn
In order to attain the impossible one must attempt the absurdMiguel de Unamuno (1865-1936)

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12 years 6 months ago #101145 by Jay
Thanks ern :)

I had always heard about the Coloured origins of Afrikaans, while searching the internet, I came across this enlightenng piece of information.

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Coloureds were responsible for the earliest written form of Afrikaans. Muslims at the Cape, wrote Afrikaans for the first time using Arabic letters. The first publication in 'Arabic' Afrikaans appeared in 1845, in Abu Bakr's 'Uiteensetting van die Godsdiens'

from the website www.mieliestronk.co.za :

\"OEWHANS wiet die riegtie wieg,\" lees ’n mens. Dit lyk nie na Afrikaans nie. Totdat jy die woorde hardop vir jouself uitspreek en besef daar staan \"ons weet die regte weg\".

Nog ’n getranskribeerde voorbeeld van hoe die Afrikaans van die Moslem-gemeenskap van destyds in Arabiese skrif voorgestel is, is: \"Al die dank an parais es rieg fer Allah alien\" (Al die dank en prys is reg vir Allah alleen).

En kyk 'n bietjie na ’n sinsnede soos \"waas gawies fantefoewhar\" — dis mos \"was vantevore gewees\" in hedendaagse Afrikaans.

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12 years 6 months ago #101147 by Gnarls
^2 dem duidelik my brah, 2 dem duidelik! :p

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12 years 6 months ago - 12 years 6 months ago #101663 by Jay
Gnarls wrote:

^2 dem duidelik my brah, 2 dem duidelik! :p


Eintlik toe ek dit die eerste keer lees was dit nie so duidelik vir my nie :laugh: But phonetically it sounds pretty similar to the way Capetonians speak Afrikaans today. Djy wiet mos! :laugh:
Last Edit: 12 years 6 months ago by Jay. Reason: My Afrikaans is going to the dogs...

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12 years 6 months ago #101668 by Gnarls
Nay boeta, ekke is mossie ape vannie Cape!

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12 years 6 months ago #101672 by Jay
Is djy sieker? Djy lyk dan vi my soessie chimpenzee van Kimberley :P

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12 years 6 months ago #101674 by Gnarls
Djy kan mos sien innie oe!

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12 years 6 months ago #101675 by Jay
Verwag djy nou rerig dat ek in 'n ape se oege moet kyk? :laugh:

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12 years 6 months ago #101677 by ern18
lmao@ Jay & Gnarls...:laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

No man can make you feel inferior unless you give him your consent Bryce Courtnay in White Thorn
In order to attain the impossible one must attempt the absurdMiguel de Unamuno (1865-1936)

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12 years 6 months ago #101691 by zulugirl
The \"coloured people\" is the official South African term for the country's mixed descent inhabitants. They are the third largest population group in the country and today number just over three million. The Coloureds (as they are commonly called) live primarily in the Western Cape. Subcultures exist within the broad grouping: Cape Coloureds, Griquas and Cape Malays.

The coloured community has diverse origins. The Dutch colonials began importing slaves from as early as 1658. They came from elsewhere in Africa and from some of the islands of the Indian and Atlantic oceans. It was inevitable that admixtures were to follow. The Khoikhoi, Xhosa and white man added their own progeny over the decades. The Cape Malay has Indian, Arab, Malagasy, Chinese and Malay blood. These people are held together by their religion. They live mostly in Cape Town. The Griquas, who have a strong sense of identity, live in the Northern Cape. They are descended from Khoikhoi and white ancestors who met 200 years ago.

Coloureds were traditionally fishermen, farm labourers and servants. Today, many still live on farms, as farm labourers and in rural settlements. However, a large number of this community has begun to take their rightful places in politics, commerce, industry, education and the arts. Coloured folklore and music has become an integral part of the cultural scene in South Africa

In general and in cultural terms, there is very little to distinguish the coloured people from South Africans of European origin. Formal race classification seem to be unjust. Some 87% of coloured people are Christian; they are mostly bilingual, although Afrikaans is their first language.

The coloured people were rather closely integrated into the Cape community. But in the 1950's they were removed from the voters' roll. Their residential areas became legally delineated in terms of the Group Areas Act.

New, soulless towns were built for the natural increase in population, such as Mitchell's Plain and the Cape Flats. In the 1970's the famed District Six, the heart of the coloured community in Cape Town was sadly demolished.
Today all suburbs are effectively multiracial, but the racial lines still remain

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12 years 6 months ago #102563 by Igor
Besig om The Puritans in Africa te lees , heel interesant.

Blykbaar was Andries Pretorius se seketaris tydens die slag van Bloed Rivier 'n bruin ou en een van die Trekke na Namibia was gely deur 'n Bruin ou , kannie nou die naam ontdou nie maar 'n hy't sy fortein gemaak deur te trade met die stamme , toe 'n trek gereel na namibia toe maar was geRetief deur een van die stam hoofde toe hy besig was om te onderhandle vir grond en die trek het uitmekaar geval .

AI die dinge wat hulle ons nooit op skool geleer het nie :(

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12 years 6 months ago - 12 years 6 months ago #102574 by Lakor
It is said that the 'HORRIBLE' pronounciations of the brown people brought about afrikaans - which makes so much sense... Just that the Athnic Africans only sees and views it as the oppressors language... Afrikaans is ours, the coloured people, when will we rise and take foot hold of what is ours, well I have cause I am one coloured boy with an attitude to that of a king, a EuraAfrican as claimed by the Lesotho goverment - partial subjects of European Kingdoms, federations, republics and principalities!

OUR HISTORY IS RICH!
Last Edit: 12 years 6 months ago by Lakor.

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12 years 6 months ago - 12 years 6 months ago #104918 by Jay
zulugirl wrote:

New, soulless towns were built for the natural increase in population, such as Mitchell's Plain and the Cape Flats. In the 1970's the famed District Six, the heart of the coloured community in Cape Town was sadly demolished.


Kimberley's Malay Camp - another forced removal

The discovery of diamonds during the latter part of the 1860s and early 1870s led to the existence of a new town, Kimberley. Thousands of fortune seekers and labourers from all over South Africa and the world streamed to Kimberley, leading to the establishment of a cosmopolitan community in
this region.

The Malay Camp grew from a settlement of Malay transport riders to a multi-racial community with Coloured, Malay, Indian, black and white residents.


Aerial view of the Malay Camp

The more affluent minority built homes of superior quality, but most of the buildings in the Camp were of poor quality.


A typical house in Malay Camp

In addition to several churches, there were also two mosques and a Hindu temple, as well as schools, shops, cinemas, a swimming pool and a police station.


One of the mosques in the Camp

It was a lively and colourful place. Malay choirs and minstrels would entertain at Christmas and New Year. There were bands and regular social functions at venues in the Camp.


Minstrels - the Dagga Coons

The community took the lead in the formation of coloured cricket and rugby asscociations, while sports like football, boxing, hockey, tennis and swimming were also practiced. The most famous resident of the Camp was probably Sol Plaatje, accomplished intellectual, journalist, linguist, politician, translator, and writer.


Schools Sports Day

There were problems too. Poor infrastructure, overcrowding, illegal liquor canteens, gambling and illegal diamond dealing.

Site clearance of the Malay Camp began in the 1940s. Most of the inhabitants were moved to the Florianville township, while the more affluent bough properties in the Barkly Road, West End and Transvaal Road areas. In contrast to District Six, except for the Catholic and Methodist churches, all the churches, mosques and temples were flattened.


Kids celebrating their First Holy Communion at St Mary's Cathedral. My late uncle is in the front row, 3rd from the left.

The area is now home to the Kimberley civic centre and part of the central business district.


The Digger's Fountain in the Kimberley civic centre, just after it's completion in the 60s

(Sorry for the poor resolution of the pics)
Last Edit: 12 years 6 months ago by Jay.

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12 years 6 months ago #104922 by tururu
Verrry informative Jay! Thanks for contributing.

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12 years 6 months ago #104931 by Gissel
wow Jay

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12 years 6 months ago #105016 by Shantell
This is very interesting, will definitely go out to buy some of the books that you have mentioned.

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12 years 6 months ago #105019 by The Preacher
My son came home the other day with an assignment about coloured people,it was quite interesting since he is in a multi racial shool.

Afterwards he said; really proudly, that he enjoyed learning about coloured people and he even asked me did you know questions...

All children should learn about each others cultures and history cause that way respect will be build amongst them.

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12 years 6 months ago #105067 by zulugirl
WE ARE A BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE.

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12 years 6 months ago #105072 by The Preacher
That is so true it's just a pitty not all our people sees it that way...

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