Topic-icon Coloured History

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12 years 3 months ago #105076 by zulugirl
The Preacher wrote:

That is so true it's just a pitty not all our people sees it that way...


BECAUSE OF THE BLUE, GREEN, HAZEL, CONTACTS THEY WEAR. :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

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12 years 3 months ago - 12 years 3 months ago #105395 by Jay
Glad you liked my story. It's part of my family history, but my grandparents weren't very forthcoming with details about life in the Malay Camp. I suppose they were trying to erase the scars. I actually found out that the spot where my grandparents' house was located is now part of the parking lot of a Pick n Pay store. I can't imagine how they must have felt walking across that parking lot.
Last Edit: 12 years 3 months ago by Jay.

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12 years 3 months ago #106139 by Mac Daddy
Ek dink it sal kwaai is vir laaities om al op skool te leer van hul heritage, in plaas van die pledge...
Ek dink hulle moet some sort of learning programme optrek oor Coloured than and now en onse laaities moet dit op vat as n chapter in history, obviously as die ander race' ook wil kan hulle die selle doen. n Dictionary sal ook kwaai is as daar nie alreeds een is nie??
So gepraat, kan iemand my se wat is a Malay Coloured??

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12 years 3 months ago #106237 by LeeLou
sMac Daddy wrote:

Ek dink it sal kwaai is vir laaities om al op skool te leer van hul heritage, in plaas van die pledge...
Ek dink hulle moet some sort of learning programme optrek oor Coloured than and now en onse laaities moet dit op vat as n chapter in history, obviously as die ander race' ook wil kan hulle die selle doen. n Dictionary sal ook kwaai is as daar nie alreeds een is nie??
So gepraat, kan iemand my se wat is a Malay Coloured??


These are mainly people descending from slaves taken from Malaysia/ Indonesia and mostly found in the Western Cape. Cape Malays are mainly of islamic faith.

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12 years 2 months ago #116591 by Jay
Stumbled across this really informative website with articles written by Coloured historian, Patric Tariq Mellet. Here's one of his articles:

The Story of the Emergence of New National Groups in South Africa over the last 500 years

A number of new national group formations emerged in the modern period in South Africa from 1500 onwards.

From a tiny Southern Nguni clan, named by the San and Khoi as the Xhosa (angry people) some time around 1500, over the following two centuries there emerged the modern day Xhosa national group who are a mixed people made up of a number of southern Nguni clans, as well as from Khoi, San, Griqua and even shipwrecked Asian slaves and Europeans. Later infusions of Khoi, slave and European bloodlines in the 1700s and 1800s during the 100 years war further added to the mixed identity of the amaXhosa.

From the 1620’s there also emerged the beginning of the development of another national group that over time would be labelled as Coloured or Cape Creole. Indigenous Khoi and San, mixed with imported West and East African, Indonesian and Indian slaves, as well as with Europeans resulted in the emergence of a new people in and around Cape Town and its farming areas. These were also the first people to be labeled as Afrikanders, Mulatto or Creole (Orlams). From amongst this new formation of people a number of distinct new groups would later emerge. The first of these was the Orlams Afrikaners, the Basters and the shortlived Free Blacks. The Free Blacks largely succumbed to Smallpox and some assimilated into the white Afrikaner group. Oude Ram Afrikaner and his descendants Jager Afrikaner and Jonker Afrikaner were to eventually form the distinct Orlams Afrikaner clan to be found mainly in Namibia today. Barend Barends established the Basters.

The other new national group to emerge in the period 1652 - 1800 was made up of European settlers primarily from the Netherlands, France, Germany and the Scandanavian countries with a further infusion of about 5% non-European roots. These colonists were generally known as Cape Dutch or Creole Dutch and would in later years also experience the infusion of a range of other Europeans into their ranks. The rural pioneers of this group attracted the name Trek-Boers and Boers. In time, in the 1800s they usurped the term Afrikaner and built a national identity around this term.

In the latter part of the 1700s and the early part of the 1800s a social revolution with many causes took place in the territories north, north-east and north-west of the Cape Colony. This upheaval is known as the Mfecane (and Difaqane on the highveld). It resulted in the formation of a number of new national identities to meet the changing, challenging and competitive new socio-economic environment. The major new identity to emerge was that of the modern Zulu national group. A new super confederacy of clans, chiefdomships and group formations lead by Shaka with the previously small Zulu clan as its nucleus, replaced the older Mthethwa and Ndwandwe confederacies. By the mid 1800s in the north-eastern parts of South Africa the Zulu held complete hegemony.

Also as a result of the Difaqane, South Africa saw the rmergence of the Sotho under Mosheshoe, the Ndebele under Mzilikazi, the Pedi under Sekwati, the Taung under Moletsane, the Tlokwa under Manthatisi and Sekonyela and the Southern Tswana under Mankurwane.

Criss-crossing all of these new national formations, were those formations of proto-national groups that emerged from the social revolution that took place over the mid 1700s to mid 1800s in the ‘wild west’ of South Africa, along the Gariep River. In the mid 1700s emergent mixed communities made up of Khoi, San, runaway slaves, European non-conformists and, their mixed offspring, formed in the districts of Namaqualand, Cedarberg, Bokkeveld, Hantam and the Roggeveld. (Such communities also emerged on the eastern-frontier – Graff-Reinet) Initially these people who were called Basters (Bastards) farmed alongside white settlers but were increasingly squeezed out from their land and they ended up seeking out refuge in remoter parts. From the outer limits of the colony they finally found themselves outside of the colony alongside the Nama and the Korana.

They also found themselves alongside many brigand raiding groups of which the Orlams Afrikaners of Jager Afrikaner stood out as the most powerful. The territories on either side of the Garieb and the whole of the Northern Cape outside of the Cape Colony was a ‘wild west’ where having a gun, ammunition, a horse and a whole lot of fearlessness was premium for survival.
Adam Kok was a freed slave who had the rights to farm in the Piketberg district emerged as a leadership figure and founding father of the more formal formation of Basters who would go on to become the Griqua national group.

Adam Kok married the daughter of a Khoi chief of the Chariguriqua clan. It is from this clan name that the name ‘Griqua’ later emerged in the 1750s. Adam Kok drew a following as he too was forced out of Piketberg to Little Namaqualand. In the 1790s his son, Cornelius Kok, moved out of the Colony to the Garieb and then later to the area now known as Griqaland West. He was joined by many other Basters, Khoi, runaway slaves and some San. The Kok family and the Barends family were the most prominent amongst these Basters. At this time the flamboyant (and drunken) missionary, John Campbell developed a fairly unique relationship with the Basters and convinced them they should jettison the derogatory name and begin to develop a code, a system of government and a constitution in their own interest. This is how the term Griqua was adopted and a system of chiefs introduced that were called Kaptyns, along with their own magistrates. A strong system of social cohesion was steadily introduced and a formal national formation emerged. Within this system from under the original mentorship of Adam Kok, emerged Andries Waterboer who rose to influence in the 1820s as a Kaptyn. Under Waterboer strong ties were forged with missionaries and a politically autonomous settlement was founded at Klaarwater, later to be called Griquatown.

The missionaries at one level brought cohesion but at another caused schism and fanned tension. The divisions became chronic over time. The relationship between the Koks and Barends on the one hand and Waterboer, the protégé of the missionaries on the other, worsened. Adam Kok the second and Barend Barends led their followers out of Griquatown, moving first to Campbell and Danielskuil, and then to Philipopolis and Boetskap. In these processes the Griqua also enmeshed with the Difaqane social revolution. They came into conflict with a number of other groups in the region.

Griqua groups and influences filtered down into the Eastern Cape and eventually the Griqua came full circle landing up in the Western Cape in Plettenberg Bay, George, Touwsriver, the Cape Peninsula and then back up the west coast again. The great Griqua leader and diviner Andries Abraham Stockenstroom le Fleur was imprisoned for agitation and relliousness in 1898 at the Breakwater prison for 14 years. He was known as Die Kneg. (For more info www.ratelgat.co.za )

This brief overview (and not comprehensive) just gives a little glimpse on our history of national group formation in South Africa and contextualises where coloured ancestry fits into the bigger picture. We have grown up with great distortions about this history and the interlinkages which binds our past and our destiny. All of us tend to talk in a manner which suggests that we represent ancient peoples, but almost all South Africans are descendents of fairly modern socio-national group formations with intertwined histories, while all also have more distant links to more than one (and often shared) ancient peoples. Almost all of South Africa’s national groups have a degree of mixture of ancestral lines which cross group boundaries. We share ancestors and this fact makes nonsense of claims of race and ethnic purity from whichever corner it may eminate.

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1 week 5 days ago #204290 by rtiiosl
Guys, do you hear all that news about discrimination of "black" people? It`s terrible. Once, I saw the situation when a guy couldn`t withdraw his money from an online casino, cause he was black. How is that legal? They, they can`t do that. I think it`s no matter what color of your skin. we all have equal rights. By the way, who knows, can people of different nationalities play here, follow this url ?

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