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Tuesday, 17 December 2019 07:41

A Visitor's Guide To The Real Cape Town - Navigating Cape Flats Lingo Featured

Written by Yulanda Anne Gombard
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It's officially the start of our festive holiday season and there will naturally be an influx of visitors to our beautiful city - visitors from other provinces in our country, as well as ones from beyond our borders. Of course we want everyone to feel welcome.
I have decided to provide some help to you, our dear visitors from all over, as you move around our city, attempting to understand the unique language which is spoken in our neck of the woods, as well as for when you try to get to grips with some of our cultural nuances.

 Below is a glossary of popular terms and phrases and their meanings:

 
* "Awé/Aweh!" This is a common greeting and a means of welcoming you, which simply means: Hello/Hi!
 
 
* "Waa' willie laanie wiess?" This simply means: Where do you want go to or be? After which, directions will be provided.
 
 
* "Dyd'likk, may bru!" This means that your plan/idea, or what you have just said, is very well received. English equivalent: Great stuff!
 
 
* "Stiek ytt, may bru!" This is a cordial invitation to come and visit the person at his/her house, or a jovial invitation to a party.
 
 
* "Wot kine, eksê?!!" This is uttered when the person doesn't understand what you're saying - or why you did something, and an immediate explanation is required.
 
 
* "Hie's jou geluk!!" Pay attention when you hear these words when you're out and about at various places in our city, as you are about to stumble upon an amazing bargain.
 
 
* "Het djy'rie kroon, may bru?" This is retail speak and simply a means of establishing whether you have the money to pay for the goods or services being provided.
 
 
* "Nou ry, gou ry, Mowbray!!" These words are usually uttered by a taxi guard - also referred to as a "gaa'chie". And they are an indication of the direction in which the minibus taxi - the popular means of public transport in our city, is heading.
 
 
WATCH: Nadeem 'Diempie' Swartz - Cape Town's Dancing Taxi Guardjie On The Move
 
 
* "Netta bie'chie liefde, mense. Kanalla!" This means that the taxi driver, or the aforementioned 'gaa'chie', wants the passengers in the vehicle to sit very, very close to the person next to them, in order to cram as many people as possible into the vehicle. So just obey the instruction.
 
 
* "Djy ry alwee' innie bus metta trein ticket!!" Although modes of transport are used in this phrase, it has nothing to do with travelling. It simply means that you are clueless as to what is being said, or what is going on - or you are doing something wrong.
 
 
* "Vi'keere têksie!!" Even though the colloquial word for 'taxi' is being used here, this phrase refers to something completely different. And it means that you've summed things up wrongly. English equivalent: Not gonna happen!
 
 
* "Djy maak jou laat!" This is a variant of the above expression and has a similar meaning. English equivalent: "SO not gonna happen!"
 
 
* "Dingiss, hoe lykitt?!" This apparently qualifies as an invitation for a romantic date, and is usually uttered by a young man who is interested in the young woman passing him on the street. To which the young woman often replies: "Djy maak jou laat!! Vi'kere têksie!"
 

Please note: When you are confronted by someone on the street peddling gold watches, or other pieces of gold jewellery, and you enquire if it is pure gold, and they answer very emphatically: " S'tru, may bru!! Pure gold, may laanie!" Please resist the urge to buy it...trust me, this piece of advice is for your own good as the "pure gold" accreditation is highly questionable.
 
 
I hope that the above glossary of terms and phrases will come in handy, and will aid you greatly during your stay in our beautiful city. WELCOME TO CAPE TOWN!!! COME JOIN THE PARTY!!!

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