Displaying items by tag: History

I write with tears. Today, South Africa has lost a great spiritual leader and his family and loved ones have lost a strong loving force in their lives.
Reverend Leonard Maart was a humble man who raised a beautiful family and was very proud of his heritage and his community.
I’m going to try and not make this little tribuite about me, however, he influenced me greatly 25 years ago (when I first went to South Africa) so I thought this would be a good opportunity to share my experience with Reverend Maart from that time period in South Africa, that space, those emotions, apartheid, understanding Cape Town, etc…

Published in Opinions
Your help is needed in piecing together some of the hidden history of Durban's Coloured population group in a bid to explore narratives around this history from the perspectives of those who are willing to contribute material and knowledge to the Proclamation 73 Open-access Visual Memoryspace Project.
That means that you can through images and documentation contribute to the visual telling of your family's and your community's history and help weave the tapestry which aims to make the hidden histories of Durban come to life.
Published in Community News
I am often accused of taking an anti-white stance and I always reply that I take an "anti-whiteness" position not anti "Afro-European" people or culture. There is a difference and that difference is written in blood and heroism.
Published in Opinions
Sunday, 08 April 2018 15:16

Jan van Riebeeck - UNPLUGGED

For many years in our youth under the shadow of Apartheid 6th April was a public holiday called Van Riebeeck’s Day or Founder’s Day... BUT who was the real van Riebeeck?
 Those who place Jan van Riebeeck on a pedestal elevating him to playing a much larger and benevolent role in our past than is factual, and who project him as a fair and blameless man, are often rather ignorant of the bigger picture that make up this man’s life. Few people can present an actual biography of this man and few people have read his detailed journal and his letters from the Cape. In fact his present day supporters are much less honest about what happened, than Jan van Riebeeck himself.
Published in Opinions

Students protest at UWC, Cape Town, 1976 - Picture: www,sahistory.org
The idea of making the commemoration of 16 June 1976 more relevant to where we live or where we are from, no matter where that is in South Africa, has always been tugging at my sleeves.
There was especially this sense that very little was being done to honour and commemorate those young struggle heroes from the Western Cape where I live and acknowledge their part in the 1976 student uprisings.

Each year I try to look at different things that can get us a little closer to this idea and this year I have come across an initiative that very much ties in with it. Added to that, I have also found my own personal way of commemorating the youth from my own area who have lost their lives shaping our collective future.

Finding the Hidden Histories
Based in Mowbray Cape Town, The Tshisimani Centre for Activist Education is launching an oral and documentary history project that will draw focus to how the 1976 Student Uprising unfolded in greater Cape Town.

Published in Articles

Portrait of Simon van der Stel

The period 1679 to 1713 at the Cape of Good Hope was a time when the Colony was poised to develop in a number of possible directions large due to the efforts of two men who in today’s language would have been said to be “Coloured”. The first two Governors of the Cape Simon van der Stel and his son Willem Adrian van der Stel were remarkable men who made an indelible contribution to development at the Cape, laying the foundations for possibly a very different future to the trajectory on which the Cape and indeed South Africa would develop.

Published in Articles