Displaying items by tag: Mixedrace

Monday, 15 August 2016 23:32

Don’t be Fooled by My Complexion


Don’t be fooled by my complexion, as a mixed-race individual I’m proud of my Black side, and no, I’m not wearing an ANC scarf hoping for a tender as I write this – it’s because by me knowing that side of myself I know there are certain values that are sacrosanct, I respect that, but I do not fight against my independent-mindedness - I know that adults must be given some leeway but ultimately they too need to earn respect.

Published in Opinions


The South African Movement for Equality (SAME) has called on the support of the public in their demand for equitable access to public broadcast media for the census-defined Coloured population group.
This group includes all people who are deemed to be Coloured as defined on census forms irrespective whether they self-identify as Coloured or whether they choose to self-identify as among others, Khoi, San, Khoisan, Bruin, Kullid, Mixed-race, Black or just South African.
An online petition has been created by SAME founding member Charles Ash to address the unequal  or non-existent access to state-funded broadcast media afforded to this population group

Published in Community News

Every year thousands of Muslim men gather at Seapoin Promenade, Cape Town, for prayers and the sighting of the new moon which signals the start and will also a month later signal the end of Ramadan.
For a vast majority of non-Muslims living on the Cape Flats, the guidelines suggested further below are mostly common knowledge, but we at Bruinou.com know that there are also many of our non-Muslim readers from all over the country who might not be too familiar with Muslim religious observances and might be at a loss for what level of consideration their Muslim friends and colleagues might  'expect' from them while they are observing the month of Ramadan.

Published in Community News

Professor Ralph George Hendrickse 1926-2010 - Image Source: The Lancet
Had he decided to stay in Apartheid South Africa, his abilities would have been stifled and he certainly would not have made any or much impact in the fields of medical research and academics.

Ralph Hendrickse was born in Cape Town on 5 November 1926 into a mixed race family that had emigrated to South Africa in the 18th century from Holland and Java. He was the son of William and Johanah (née Dennis) Hendrickse.
He was raised in a Coloured community of richly educated teachers who regarded teaching and learning as pathways to upliftment. He matriculated first class from Livingstone High, a Coloured school, at the age of 15 years.

Published in Articles